yeast Archives - Lifelab Testing

Foods With Yeast to Avoid

Yeast is a type of fungus commonly used in food production. You can find yeast in popular foods and drinks like kombucha, bread, sweets, and most baked goods. Yeast is also naturally present in the body, but it’s a different species known as candida. When there’s an imbalance in the body, that’s when you’ll have a yeast infection. The yeast in your body can flare up, causing imbalances due to antibiotics or lifestyle changes.

When you’re trying to avoid foods with yeast, it’s primarily because of an existing yeast intolerance or yeast allergy. A true yeast allergy is rare, and it may be due to other proteins in beverages like beer and wine rather than yeast itself. But even though a yeast allergy is rare, a yeast intolerance isn’t. About 50 million Americans suffer from allergies, but only a few of them are food and yeast allergies{1}. A yeast intolerance can result in gastrointestinal issues like diarrhoea, gas, and cramps. It is important to note that the gut naturally contains its yeast, and some foods can trigger it even if they don’t have yeast.

Despite having yeast intolerance or allergy, some people go yeast-free because it helps manage candida symptoms{2}. Candida overgrowth causes yeast infections in the urinary tract, the mouth, and the gastrointestinal tract. One theory as to why candida overgrowth happens is believed to be the misuse or overuse of antibiotics. Too many antibiotics result in the death of good microflora in the gut, allowing space for the growth of candida and other harmful bacteria. Another reason for the overgrowth of candida is excessive stress and hormone imbalance. So, a yeast-free diet is also believed to help regulate this bacteria.

Foods with yeast

Certain foods are notorious for containing yeast. When getting into a yeast-free diet, it is necessary to note foods to avoid with yeast. They include:

  • Leavened baked goods- Most baked goods are foods with the most yeast. They include bread, muffins, croissants, and biscuits containing yeast. Bakers use yeast to make these goods rise and add flavour. So, if you love baked goods, it is essential to inquire whether or not yeast was used in the preparation.
  • Breakfast cereals- Most cereals contain malt. Malt is fermented barley made with yeast. It is necessary to avoid malt if you have an allergy or intolerance to yeast. In most packaged products, you’ll find it labelled as “malt syrup” or “malt extract.”
  • Sweets- Most types of sweets contain malt as an ingredient. If you’re following a yeast-free diet, you’ll need to check the ingredients list on candies.
  • Beverages- Many alcoholic drinks are fermented with yeast. In liquor, the different types of yeast help achieve a particular flavour that the brewer wants to achieve. All kinds of alcohol have some traces of yeast, and those who suffer from yeast allergy need to avoid these beverages at all costs altogether. Kombucha is made using sugar, tea, bacteria, and yeast.
  • Miso- There are types of miso that use yeast in their fermentation process.
  • Soy sauce- Yeast is a common ingredient in soy sauce. So, when buying processed foods, you can find soy sauce to be an ingredient.
  • Berries and grapes- Even though most foods contain added yeast, it occurs naturally in some foods like grapes and berries. So, if you’re allergic to yeast, even the tiny amounts present in these fruits will result in an allergic reaction.

Why you should avoid foods with yeast

If you have yeast intolerance, consuming any foods with yeast may result in digestive issues. Even though digestive problems aren’t life-threatening, they can’t still cause inconveniences because of how you’ll feel, interfering with the quality of your life. Some people also suffer from yeast allergy, which has some severe symptoms and, in some cases, can even be life-threatening. Many people who suffer from a yeast allergy are also allergic to other fungi and moulds.

If you’re perfectly healthy and don’t suffer from either an allergy or intolerance to yeast, you shouldn’t deny yourself the amazing foods and drinks made using yeast. However, you’ll find that some people follow a yeast-free diet to help prevent candida infections.

If you aren’t sure why you are reacting to yeast, you should know that there are three leading causes. These include:

  • Yeast buildup– Sometimes, an overload of yeast in the body can result in a yeast infection. When you have a fungal infection, the symptoms will be similar to those of an allergy, and the difference will be that it’s curable. Some antibiotics will help chase away the yeast infection and a lifestyle change.
  • Yeast allergy- When you’re allergic to yeast, you will notice symptoms affecting the whole body leading to changes in mood, skin reactions, and widespread body pain. Allergic reactions can, at times, be dangerous to your general health and life. A yeast allergy occurs because the body assumes that “yeast” is a harmful foreign bacteria and attacks it. This attack leads to various symptoms that we see physically on the body.
  • Yeast intolerance- Yeast intolerance isn’t as severe as yeast allergy. Most of the symptoms are limited to the digestive tract. Yeast intolerance occurs when the body finds proteins in yeast that it is sensitive toward or it can’t digest as it lacks the proper enzymes to do the job. So, when you consume foods fermented with yeast or foods made with yeast and you have a yeast intolerance, then you will get various gastrointestinal symptoms.

What’s the difference between a yeast allergy and intolerance?

While these two are what mainly cause people to avoid foods with yeast, they are not similar conditions. The symptoms of yeast allergy and intolerance vary from one person to another. However, yeast intolerance is more common than yeast allergy. Yeast intolerance symptoms can take days, while a yeast allergy symptom shows almost immediately.

While a yeast intolerance can cause some discomfort, unpleasant sensations, and pain, a yeast allergy is more severe and life-threatening. One of the most severe yeast allergy symptoms is anaphylaxis, which can lead to a coma or even death if not treated immediately.

While yeast intolerance affects the gastrointestinal tract due to the body’s difficulty digesting the food, a yeast allergy causes symptoms all over the body because it triggers the immune system. Both conditions affect different parts of the body.

You can outgrow a yeast intolerance by working closely with your doctor to make your body resistant. However, you can’t outgrow an allergy; it’s there to stay if you’re already an adult. Only kids can outgrow food allergies when they grow up. When it comes to yeast intolerance, some people can tolerate specific amounts of yeast, while others can’t. But when you’re allergic to yeast, you can’t take a small amount of yeast and not get a reaction. Even trace amounts of yeast result in allergy symptoms.

Yeast intolerance and allergy test

If you react to yeast, it is best to talk to your doctor and get their opinion on the matter. Once they rule out any underlying conditions, you can consider other possibilities like yeast allergy or yeast intolerance. The most common yeast intolerance and yeast allergy symptoms include:

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Our Complete Intolerance & Allergy Test Kit
  • Rashes
  • Bloating
  • Joint pain
  • Breathing difficulty
  • Dizziness
  • Gastrointestinal issues

If you see the above symptoms, you’ll need to get yourself an Allergy and Intolerance Test, which will help you understand whether you’re suffering from a yeast allergy or yeast intolerance. You can easily order your test kit online and have it delivered to your doorstep within three days. You can mail back the sample to the labs, where it will be cross-checked against many other common allergens, and you’ll get your result within a week. You will also get a list of items you should eliminate from your diet to avoid further symptoms and inconveniences.

Final thoughts on avoiding foods with yeast

If consuming foods with yeast causes you discomfort, it is best to look into the main problem that you may have at hand. Sometimes people get reactions when they drink beer and not when they eat leavened bread, and that’s a sign that you don’t have a yeast intolerance or allergy but rather a problem with some other proteins present in the beer. Once you are sure that it could either be an intolerance or allergy, you can get yourself an Allergy and Intolerance Test online, and it will help you determine whether it’s one or the other. If you have either issue, it’s best to take up a yeast-free diet to avoid further symptoms and hurting your body.

References

  1. Food Allergy. American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology. Source: https://acaai.org/allergies/allergic-conditions/food/
  2. Bauer, B. A. (2014, August 5). What is a candida cleanse diet and what does it do? Source:https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/expert-answers/candida-cleanse/faq-20058174

How to Avoid Yeast

Yeast can be a problematic food for many of us. Between yeast allergies, intolerances, candida, and dropping the ingredient for the dietary benefits, there are plenty of reasons to leave yeast out of your diet. Whatever has driven you to remove yeast from your diet, we’ve got a few tips to help you out.

Change your major carb source

We’re not going to suggest that you drop carbohydrates altogether like many popular diets around but changing your major carbohydrate source will be helpful in eliminating yeast from your diet. This is much easier than it seems. While there are a lot of yeast filled carb sources, such as bread, pastries, breaded food and pasta, but there are also solid yeast-free carbs to choose from. Try swapping your bread and pasta for rice and potatoes.

If you insist on enjoying baked goods on your new diet (we can’t blame you!) then opting for wheat-free flours is the way to go. Try potato-based flours, spelt or other flours that don’t contain gluten.

Avoid fermented goods altogether

That means vinegar, alcohol and any other foods that contain fermented ingredients. It’s also best to remove fruit, fruit juice and dried fruit from the diet for this reason. If you’re avoiding yeast to beat candida you should really avoid sugar and sweeteners altogether.

Sugar is what the candida feeds off, so while avoiding yeast, you should also seek to starve the candida by avoiding sugar in all forms. That includes fructose, sucrose and other forms of simple sugars.

Skip the Soya

Much of the soy used is fermented, and since the ingredients lists don’t exactly give you a detailed history of each ingredient, it’s best to just avoid the ingredient altogether. Once you aim to get rid of soy from your diet, you may be surprised to see just how frequently it is used as an ingredient in pre-packaged food. Another reason to enjoy home-cooked meals and avoid processed stuff.

Yeast-Free = Healthy?

It’s not the most usual diet but going yeast-free can be very beneficial to your health. But it’s not that eliminating yeast alone is healthier for you (unless you have a yeast allergy or yeast intolerance). Going yeast-free coincidentally means swapping sugary snacks and baked goods for more nutritious options, like nuts and seeds, meat, vegetables and fish.

Drinking with a Yeast Intolerance over Christmas

We all enjoy an alcoholic drink or two with family and friends over the festive season. But those with allergies and intolerances can have a tougher time finding a drink that doesn’t lead to uncomfortable or potentially life-threatening symptoms. Particularly if you have a yeast intolerance or allergy, yeast is a primary ingredient in the production of these beverages.

Fermented Alcoholic Drinks

The problem for those with a yeast allergy is mostly with fermented drinks. All alcoholic beverages use yeast to help with the fermentation process. It’s used to turn the sugars into ethanol. No yeast, no alcohol.

There are a few options that those avoiding yeast can still drink on a night out though. But be warned, this is mostly anecdotal, and there is still more research needed.

Distilled Spirits – the Non-Allergenic Saviour

Because distilling a drink usually removes most yeast by-products from the liquid, the vast majority of them are considered yeast-free. The consensus is that the distillation process removes all but the most minute traces of yeast from these drinks.

Clear liquors such as Vodka and Gin are common choices for those avoiding yeast. They’re also considered the best options for avoiding a hangover because they’ve been refined. The refining often removes undesirable congeners which are also believed to contribute to hangovers. So, opting for a clear spirit could be a doubly wise choice for the yeast intolerant drinker. You could end up experiencing fewer side-effects of alcohol than those without any intolerances or allergies at all!

It’s not a Perfect Science – Yet

While the expectation is that distilled drinks shouldn’t be a problem for those with Yeast allergies, there has been very little research into it. If you are allergic to yeast, its best to discuss further allergy testing with your allergist or doctor before adding any of these drinks to your diet.